To judge a book by its cover?

I’ve sent off a possible cover design for my forthcoming book on the 19th Century Barrys which I pulled together in a few minutes using a cheap software programme.

I didn’t plan to do this but an opportunity came up for a free assessment by a cover designer so I thought I’d give it a go.

I found a template with a picture of the Eiffel Tower on it and then played around a bit with the title and my name. Of course for this book the structure could be one of many towers, depending on how I want to represent the Barrys visually without just sticking their portraits on the cover.

They say you should trial a range of different cover designs with audiences to see which ones work best, but I don’t have the budget for that.

What criteria do I think should be important for a potential reader?

  • Confirmation that they are looking at the right category of book e.g. historical non-fiction about buildings and their builders
  • Sense of pleasurable expectation of an experience that opening the cover might lead to.
  • Hint of quality of a product that can’t be touched before purchase as it will be marketed electronically, and you can’t get refunds on books you don’t enjoy reading, caveat emptor.

I will reveal the design stages later down the line.

Author: Nick von Behr

I've been blogging since 2012 under different guises and on a range of topics mainly linked to education, but more recently focusing on the history of civil engineering and architecture. I am writing a book on the 19th-century Brunel and Barry families of successful architects and civil engineers who built the Houses of Parliament, Tower Bridge, Paddington Station and the Royal Opera House in London and the Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol.

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