Brunel, Barry and ‘modern’ Victorian architecture eBook by Nick von Behr – 9781916225701 | Rakuten Kobo

The book cover image above should always be credited as follows: Arpingstone (https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tower.bridge.7.basculecloseup.london.arp.jpg), size and alignment by Elisa Vernazza, https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/legalcode

The e-book is currently available to order at https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/brunel-barry-and-modern-victorian-architecture

Did I write too soon? #buildingpassions

In my last post I came across all excited about progress on my forthcoming book ‘Building Passions’.

Did I write too soon?

I did get EPub and mobi (for Kindle) electronic versions of the book this week, but they require some formatting amendments and the contractor is now off on leave for a fortnight! So my deadline for publishing by end September looks compromised currently …

Similarly for the hard copy, the original printers have just conceded (nicely) that I could get a much better price elsewhere, so I’m back to square one. However, I have more time to play with.

On the more positive side, I have now fixed a launch day, time and venue for the hard copy in mid-November.

The launch venue has a strong historical connection with the famous Regency architect Sir John Nash, about whom I write, and it is located a few hundred yards away from other early 19th-century buildings which feature in the book: the Travellers Club; the Reform Club; and Carlton House Terrace, where the Royal Society can be found, and of which Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Sir Charles Barry and Sir John Wolfe Barry were all Fellows.

Some last minute picture research

We were on a mini road trip of parts of England for a few days. More than 1000 miles clocked up at least.

We dropped in on a Barry and Banks Jacobethan manor hall in Norfolk and a Nash Italianate villa built in Shropshire in 1802. We also saw Gothic Ilam Park in the Peak District and the amazing St Giles Roman Catholic Church in Cheadle by Pugin.

In between we admired the beautiful Lake District countryside where Wordsworth, Ruskin and Beatrix Potter all lived.

For me it was a reaffirmation of the treasures that can be found in my home country. Some of these I will write about in my forthcoming book. More importantly I will be able to include current day images of them.

You will have to wait until publication to see these, so in the meantime I have included a classic Lake District scene for you to contemplate – who knows it may inspire you to go there?