Did I write too soon? #buildingpassions

In my last post I came across all excited about progress on my forthcoming book ‘Building Passions’.

Did I write too soon?

I did get EPub and mobi (for Kindle) electronic versions of the book this week, but they require some formatting amendments and the contractor is now off on leave for a fortnight! So my deadline for publishing by end September looks compromised currently …

Similarly for the hard copy, the original printers have just conceded (nicely) that I could get a much better price elsewhere, so I’m back to square one. However, I have more time to play with.

On the more positive side, I have now fixed a launch day, time and venue for the hard copy in mid-November.

The launch venue has a strong historical connection with the famous Regency architect Sir John Nash, about whom I write, and it is located a few hundred yards away from other early 19th-century buildings which feature in the book: the Travellers Club; the Reform Club; and Carlton House Terrace, where the Royal Society can be found, and of which Isambard Kingdom Brunel, Sir Charles Barry and Sir John Wolfe Barry were all Fellows.

How to find a book launch venue #buildingpassions

So, I’ve been trying to nail down a venue for the official launch of my book ‘Building Passions’ in November.

I have a date/time and I want it to take place in the Westminster part of London. I also have a budget, an idea of numbers and the type of offering.

Fortunately, I have run many events in the past so am pretty familiar with the ins and outs of the process. My most stressful experience was organising a large conference on maths education, pretty much on my own, at a venue the Government officials funding it wouldn’t show me until the start of the event! They claimed this was best security practice for the Secretary of State for Education who was keynote speaking … oh and my wife was having an operation on the same day! It all went well thankfully.

I looked at two possible venues on Wednesday with my assistant, who is my daughter starting her English language and linguistics degree from this month. One was very nice and in a famous national art gallery, but over my budget. The alternative was more affordable but not in so respectable a location, though still pleasant. There are other options on the table.

I already have one sponsor for the event and am looking for others who would like to co-fund it with me. If you are interested please contact me at enquiries@buildingpassions.co.uk .

The e-book should be published soon via the usual channels and then I need to focus on finalising the print version in time for November.

A ‘Building Passions’ website now exists #buildingpassions

So, I’ve finally managed to launch a website about my forthcoming book ‘Building Passions’.

It provides a bit of background for those who know nothing about the book. Once it is published electronically and then in hard copy, I will add links to the retailers who will hopefully sell it for me. I’m expecting an e-book will be out soon, but definitely by the end of September.

One thing I am missing is images. As I’ve blogged before this is a tricky area in self-publishing due to image rights. I will try to add in free images and links to ones you would need to pay to use (which I have done for the book!), but of course you will be able to see them all in the book, with appropriate text linked to the story of the Brunels, the Barrys and ‘modern’ Victorian architecture.

I will continue to use this website for blogs about the book and related news, including progress on an English Heritage Blue Plaque for Sir John Wolfe Barry. With luck everything will coincide …

I will also continue to use the #buildingpassions tag to promote the built environment to wider audiences through its history and the individuals involved.

Nudging your audience along #buildingpassions

I told a friend and his teenage son about my book today. It taught me that you can present the same story in many different ways.

I sat them down and literally explained the main characters and the built structures linked to them. This was a good test for my own memory and would help my comms skills when handling larger audiences.

I literally went with the flow, without any planning except my own knowledge of the book.

My main focus was on the two fathers, Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Sir Charles Barry, and their sons Sir John Wolfe Barry and Henry Marc Brunel. I mentally pictured the small tree I have drawn showing their relationships, and those with Sir Marc Brunel, father of IKB, and Sir Charles’ other sons and grandsons covered in the book.

I also covered broader issues such as the development of architectural styles and the link between ‘modernism’, Art Nouveau and the Crystal Palace.

I thought, as I spoke, of what would keep a teenager interested in the story. I tried as much interaction as I could, asking questions and then providing answers where he or his father couldn’t do so. It was all about nudging them along, but trying to avoid any topic which might appear too technical for a layperson.

It would be great if I could write books easily this way (think perhaps ‘Sophie’s World’ or ‘Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance’), but I have not quite mastered such an approach to non-fiction. May be fiction will be easier?

You can always teach an old dog new tricks …

The final steps towards publishing ‘Building Passions’ #buildingpassions

I kind of feel I’m almost there!

A pre-pub proof is now ready of my forthcoming book, short title ‘Building Passions’.

All I need to do now is typeset it, arrange the c. 70 illustrations properly, and finish off the index and all page references. Then I will know the exact spine width based on the number and thickness of the pages and so can complete the last stage of the book cover.

I’m still on schedule for an e-version published by end September and a hard copy by end November.

My only slight frustration is finding the right book launch venue in London which won’t break the bank but also fits with the book and invitees. I now understand why events planning requires help from venue finders! I’ve often had the good luck of working for organisations that have their own events spaces and teams, but no longer sadly …

In terms of printing the book I’ve decided to seek advice from a local publisher and printer. I just know that I don’t want to fell hundreds of trees in the process! Also, that a printed book needs to have a good feel about it when handled. I may be a bit weird, but I also like the smell of new (and old) books …

I should remind you of why it’s worth buying the book once available.

If you are above age 18 and have even the slightest interest in the history of the built environment e.g. why buildings, bridges and other structures have been put up in a certain way, then ‘Building Passions’ is a must for you. It does focus on Victorian/Edwardian Britain and its ‘Empire’, so hopefully you weren’t put off too much at school (I loved it!).

I’m afraid it doesn’t mention many women at all, and certainly not as architects, engineers or contractors. I’m afraid that was the way of the world at that time, and while clearly things have changed since then for the better, there is still a lot to do to increase diversity in the built environment workforce in the UK and abroad.

Who owns an image? #buildingpassions

One of the most interesting findings from self-publishing my forthcoming book (short title ‘Building Passions’) on the 19th-century Brunels and Barrys is that sourcing images is complicated!

I could probably write a separate book about this but below are some bullets.

  • My editor quite rightly advised me to start sourcing images early in the process. It has probably taken me about 4 months and there is still one outstanding one to be licensed.
  • People and organisations have different policies for licensing images ranging from free, no hassle to costly and complex! This seems to bear little relevance to the provenance of the image …
  • The internet has taken the lead in encouraging the shared use of free images through Creative Commons and similar schemes.
  • Certain images of well-known privately-owned buildings e.g. the Burj Khalifa and the Shard are copyrighted, but in the case of the Eiffel Tower while you can use a daytime image freely, you can’t use a nighttime one as the electric lighting is trademarked …
  • Non-fiction works are therefore more costly to publish so if you want to spend less, write fiction and include your own illustrations.

I am sympathetic to living producers of genuine artistic objects who need to be recognised and rewarded for their efforts, in order to allow the creative design process to flourish.

However, I am less sympathetic to others outside this category, particularly archives and agencies that charge self-publishers large sums for the reuse of their images, many of which may have outlived their ‘real’ copyright needs.

I think we need to strike a balance here, as with many areas of life. If not, one day perhaps everything we see will be labelled ‘not for reuse’, including ourselves. See this intriguing piece about copyrighting the tattoos of famous sports personalities …

Families in history and now #buildingpassions

I’m travelling to a family reunion in London to celebrate my mother’s 80th birthday.

Families are important.

I write about two of them in my forthcoming book on the 19th-century Brunels and Barrys. The full title is “Brunel, Barry and ‘modern’ Victorian architecture”. The short title is ‘Building Passions’.

In the book, the two famous families of engineers and architects connect through John Wolfe Barry and his close friend and business partner Henry Marc Brunel. Their fathers were the great Victorians Isambard Kingdom Brunel and Charles Barry, who were both Fellows of the Royal Society like their outstanding contemporary Charles Darwin. They also co-designed the 1851 Great Exhibition and Crystal Palace with Prince Albert, Joseph Paxton and others.

Families have roots and branches.

They come from somewhere and in most cases continue on, even if there are name changes along the way. Personalities appear, disappear and reappear through new generations.

This is all part of evolution and completely natural, in whatever way it may have first started.

The best families strive to work cooperatively with others for the wider good. This despite the temptation to care for their immediate lineage only.

In this way the world progresses and, we hope, avoids the pitfalls of personal greed and avarice that have become so visible today.