If the tagline is #buildingpassions what is the book about?

I thought I would have some pre-Christmas fun and think of alternative long titles for my book ‘Building Passions’, assuming I knew nothing about the content.

Here goes for starters. Enjoy and feel free to add:

  • How to arouse your partner in three easy steps
  • Why model-making turns me on
  • The 10 best buildings in which to have secret liaisons
  • Build yourself the thing you’ve always wanted, from white elephant to crib

The real challenge would be to write them!

Another Baker’s dozen until the launch of #buildingpassions

In early 2018 I posted a blog in the lead up to officially launching this website on a key date.

Sir John Wolfe Barry died on 22 January 1918 at his home, Delahay House on Chelsea Embankment. This website was set up to commemorate the centenary of that sad day and English Heritage will be putting up a Blue Plaque at the location on 19 November.

I used the phrase ‘Benjamin Baker’s Dozen’ to describe the 13 days to the launch date. It was a play on words, as Sir Benjamin Baker, the co-builder of the iconic Forth Rail Bridge, was a good friend of Wolfe Barry’s and featured on the site. Nothing about baking then!

Fast forward 22 months and I will be launching the book about John Wolfe Barry, Henry Brunel and their famous families on 20 November. Baker features in that as well, but sadly for bakers, still no new recipes!

But there is a connection.

My wife Viktoriya loves baking and has suggested that she makes a cake to celebrate the book launch. We’ve not decided on the details yet as Tower Bridge might be a bit too complex, much as I would love it!

Once it has been created I will of course publish a photo, but perhaps not the recipe which will remain a family secret for at least 100 years.

17 days and counting #buildingpassions

It’s 17 days until I launch my book ‘Building Passions’!

The last time I used a countdown on this website was leading up to celebrating 125 years of Tower Bridge earlier this year. Before that I properly launched the website in January 2018, a hundred years after the death of Sir John Wolfe Barry.

A lot has happened since then and even earlier when I first sent in my application for a Blue Plaque for JWB. In 16 days time a plaque should finally go up on the front of the house where he died on Chelsea Embankment in London.

I am currently part of a local Kent group of writers who are aiming to complete 50,000 words of a novel n the month of November, as part of a worldwide charity called NaNoWriMo. It’s not easy, but more doable if you have others in the same situation.

I have promised the group that I will tell them more about self-publishing based on my experience to date so below are some brief bullets to whet the appetite:

  • Plan, plan then plan some more – you can’t do too much!
  • Seek out those with a greater expertise than yourself whether directly or via social media
  • Be realistic about deadlines – they can shift as long as the end product is completed to a high standard, but not for ever
  • Break down the project into streams and tasks so it becomes more manageable
  • Don’t give up however bad you might feel on certain days – good news is just around the corner!
  • If you want to use lost of images and fancy design features then be prepared to spend time and money on it
  • Find reliable people to work with – they may not always be the very best, but at least they will deliver when you need it
  • Imagine what your book will look like and try and stick to that dream, with occasional adjustments
  • Above all, don’t even write a book if you aren’t convinced that people will want to read it!

Grenfell Tower: some pointers from #buildingpassions #grenfelltower

Today the first report from the official inquiry into the Grenfell Tower tragedy was published.

Its conclusions were leaked yesterday by the Daily Telegraph, despite being asked by the inquiry to wait. This pretty much sums up some of the media nowadays. The focus of resulting headlines was on the perceived inadequacies of the London Fire Brigade when dealing with the blazing inferno. Easy target …

Also today, Boris Johnson is as I write leading a short House of Commons debate about the report, in between keeping an eye on the House of Lords as it passes general election legislation.

This is all of interest to me because I write about Grenfell Tower in my new book ‘Building Passions’. This is in the concluding chapter, where I try to reflect on the wider issues that impact on our built environment.

The book is about the achievements of 19th-century families and individuals in building structures that have become iconic, such as the Houses of Parliament and Tower Bridge in London, or the Clifton Suspension Bridge or Box Tunnel in the west of England.

Grenfell Tower was by no means iconic when it was designed and built in London, but it has become a huge symbol of the frailties of modern society, which is gradually moving more and more away from community-based decisions to globally-determined ones.

The Government’s response to the report can only be fully actionable when UK politics has returned to something near normal after the Brexit hiatus, and when the second part of the inquiry has fully investigated the technical issues around the cause of the inferno, which completely surprised the brave firemen and -women who tried valiantly to tackle it.

In the past similar disasters have led to changes in the law and remedial actions by industry – this time the response needs to be considered and permanent, in so far as politicians are able to engineer long-term change for the good of all citizens, with the support of communities, the built environment sector and those whose job it is to rescue us from dangers to our life and limb.

Buy a print copy of #buildingpassions now!

My website ‘Building Passions’ now lets you pre-order a print copy of the book prior to its launch on 20 November 2019.

To note, this is currently only for deliveries to UK addresses, as I’m waiting for more clarity on Brexit to see what happens in the EU. The rest of the world will have to wait a bit while I decide on which fulfilment service to use.

If you still don’t know what I’m talking about then here is a quick recap:

  • the book’s full title is Brunel, Barry and ‘modern’ Victorian’ architecture.
  • it covers the story of two families, the Brunels and the Barrys, who were famous Victorian engineers and architects. Think the Houses of Parliament, Tower Bridge, Clifton Suspension Bridge, the Great Eastern etc.
  • the key relationship described in the book is that between the civil engineers Sir John Wolfe Barry and Henry Marc Brunel, respectively sons of renowned fathers, Sir Charles Barry and Isambard Kingdom Brunel.
  • the book also looks at the story of architecture and civil engineering as key built environment professions in 19th- and 20th-century Britain.
  • Finally, the content examines the ‘modernisation’ of architecture globally from the 19th Century on and the modern legacy of the Brunel-Barry partnership, both in terms of structures, but also the connection with physical and product standards.

If you prefer not to buy a hard copy or don’t live in the UK, you can instead purchase the e-book which is considerably cheaper and more interactive – it has an index which helps the readers easily cross-reference people with structures in the book.

Note: I’m very pleased to say that an English Heritage Blue Plaque will be put up on the London building in which Sir John Wolfe Barry died in January 1918. This is planned to take place on 19 November, the day before the book launch.

The madness of self-publishing #buildingpassions

Because I decided to self-publish my first book, I have become obsessed with every single stage of the process.

This may or may not be a good thing.

Currently, I’m fixated with marketing and distribution issues. This means trying to set up the Building Passions website for direct sales and all the associated technical and legal requirements. It also means working out the easiest and most cost effective way to mail books out to UK and overseas purchasers.

A simple example was what I did this week.

I mailed 2 proof copies of the book to a UK and and EU address to check delivery costs and duration. The EU one required a customs declaration. The UK one was tracked, but that may be a luxury.

I found a friendly, quiet Post Office where they are happy to process as many packages as I want, though they told me a No Deal Brexit could raise prices and slow down delivery times to the EU. Two large parcels arrived today with jiffy envelopes, so I just need the printed books to put into them, which should be with me from the week of 8 November.

I will commission others to do fulfilment for me assuming the orders come in regularly. It would be nice if people wanted to read the printed book enough to justify this, but they can do it electronically as well at www.kobo.com, and ultimately the environment would suffer less.

There’s always a silver lining …

When you first get your own book, it’s like seeing a new child #buildingpassions

I saw the printed version of my book today! The feeling was one of elation after 9 months gestation.

Though I didn’t carry our daughter for a similar period 19 years ago, I kind of understand the emotional ride. As a father your relationship tends to develop later on, once they are up on their feet more and starting to think for themselves.

Why did I leave it so long to write a book?

Because there were other things going on in my life and they always came first. I’m not complaining. But I did have to take a risk and stop full-time work to self-publish the book.

I did other things as well, but in effect I have had a type of parental unpaid leave with no job to go back to. My wife has been incredibly supportive throughout this period, for which I am very grateful.

What next?

I’ve started planning my next book, a historical novel, and will write it during November as part of National Novel Writing Month. I’ve already sought editing proposals for the finished draft. It will be published in 2020, 100 years since the protagonist, based on my grandfather, escaped from the Communists in Tashkent and ended up living a new life in England via Persia and India.